September 23, 2016

Posted in New Products

 

American Felling Axe by Dave Canterbury

dave-cantCreated by acclaimed wilderness skills instructor, blacksmith and New York Times bestselling author, Dave Canterbury, the new design is based on professional felling axes made popular during the 19th century American forestry industry boom.

Felling large trees the traditional way is an art requiring skill and a proper axe. Good felling axes are often expensive competition designs, too heavy for practical outdoor use. Understanding the features of a tool, and the tools intended purpose, are key elements to consider when creating the perfect woodsman’s axe. Canterbury settled on a purpose built design made for heavy use in an environment of hardwood trees. By meticulously pairing the right style of axe head with the right kind of handle, the American Felling Axe drops dense, large sized trees effectively, allowing the user to work longer without tiring.

img_20161026_162719Unlike modern curved handles that provide forward momentum and leverage at the expense of control, the Hults Bruk American Felling Axe features a perfectly straight, 32-inch American hickory handle to reduce wrist pivoting on the swing. Canterbury and Hults Bruk blacksmiths pored through several traditional models and uncovered a renowned, reliable Montreal pattern axe head. Useful for more than just felling, the pattern features wide cheeks for splitting and a long, razor sharp bit for felling, bucking and processing wood. Weighing 3 1/2 lb., the axe head is made with high quality Swedish steel, expertly forged at the historic Hults Bruk factory.

Canterbury, a blacksmith who makes many of his own tools, doesn’t have the facilities to make larger tools like axes and felt Hults Bruk was the company to craft his version of a traditional American felling axe. As the oldest axe manufacturer in the world, Hults Bruk quality and passion for excellence makes for a design that is both a usable axe for any woodsman and also an heirloom-worthy tool that can be passed from generation to generation.

 

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